A Castle Too Many

The northern borderlands of England and Scotland proved a bloody ground for its inhabitants. Once a part of early Scotland, a village at Warkworth grew up around a motte and bailey timber castle after the Norman invasion.  By the 12th century,  its keep and walls were built of stone and the fortress stood watch over a strategic loop of the River Coquet.  The powerful Percy earls, enemies of The Bruce, received the gift of the castle and surrounding lands and  played host to King Edward 1 in 1292. With the Scottish Wars of Independence in full swing in the early 1300’s, vain attempts to force a political settlement saw the lands of Northumberland and Yorkshire set ablaze.  By virtue of its location, Warkworth experienced the horror of being placed under siege, twice, by the forces of Robert the Bruce. And with the arrival of Sir Jamie Douglas and his raiding war parties, the villagers must have run for their lives from those hard-bitten warriors on their sturdy ponies.

But when the Scottish and English crowns were joined, there was less demand for such strategic strongholds in the north, and the great fortesses of Bamburgh, Dunstanburgh, and Alnwick knew a measure of peace from the Scots. Still the land was not at rest whilst alliances grew and tumbled with the Wars of The Roses.

It is hard to imagine the ordinariness of family life in a castle but Warkworth Castle’s smaller size apparently made it more suitable for a domestic residence leading the Percy earls to prefer it as a family home rather than the stiff grandeur of Alnwick Castle. In more recent times, the earls of Northumbria gained possession. Now the castle is in the care of English Heritage and its picturesqe ruined structures hold only memories.

So if you are travelling through the awesome countryside of Yorkshire and Nothumberland, stop off at Warkworth’s pretty village just a short distance from the coast. Enjoy its beauty and peace but spare a thought for the families, now long-gone, who must have endured immense hardship trying to survive the political and social upheavals of the times.

175

174

179

191

183

188

189

192

176

180

 

4 thoughts on “A Castle Too Many

  1. Michael Clelland says:

    When do you have time to see/research all these things you write about? Keep up the good work!

  2. Stunning pictures as always JM. I detect you might be deep into your writing at the moment?

  3. diaspora52 says:

    Thanks KL! Still endeavouring to write though sometimes inspiration proves elusive. But all that travel pays off – still have heaps of stories and pics forthe blog.XX

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s