A Welsh Treat

Fancy a slice of yeasty, buttery goodness, enriched with tea-soaked dried fruit, spices and warmed marmalade? Just out of the little market town of Llanwryst on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park, you’ll find a gem of a tea house, nestled beside an old stone bridge on the edge of the River Conwy. Once a residence – later a courthouse and now managed by National Trust, it is a perfect place to relax and indulge in a home-made Welsh treat – Bara Brith or “speckled bread”. My idea of heaven!

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123Include an ancient chapel, a short wander way, and you have the perfect day! For inside the musty confines of St Gwrst, there lies a stone sarcophagus, thought to be the coffin of Llewelyn the Great –  perhaps just a little hard to believe given the treatment dished out by the English to the abbey where he was buried further north – but who knows? Add some intriguing carvings, and I’m a happy traveller, wandering the misty by ways of history….

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This area of Wales on the edge of the Snowdonia National park is breath-takingly beautiful, and it is no wonder its native people fought so hard to keep its heritage, ancient culture and language intact. But the Welsh princes were weakened by internal division – royal sons fighting amongst themselves for a share of lands and patrimony – and the external might of the Plantagenet kings, succumbing eventually to King Edward 1st whose stone castles stand testament today to those brutal times.

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Llanwryst, too, is a pleasing place to wander about, owing its quiet, steady, well-to-do air to a trade in wool, clocks and harps…

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Back over the bridge and the briskly flowing Conwy, the tea house is a quiet spot – just the place to reflect on Wales’ shadowy, violent past whilst enjoying a slice of its peaceful rural heritage.

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