Endings and Beginnings

 

As 2018 slips into 2019, I thought it fitting to explore the theme of change. My destination today is Rotterdam, originally just a muddy, Rhine village settlement at the turn of the first millennium. Now it is the second largest city within The Netherlands.

We were fortunate to be able to explore this ancient city which remade itself after a catastrophic bombing in WW2 virtually destroyed its medieval heart. When Nazi Germany invaded Holland, a threat was made to bomb its cities if the country did not accede to the enemy’s demands. Reluctantly, the government acceded… but the bombers were already airborne when the Dutch army capitulated.  Thousands died in the inferno that followed.

I thought to find this city, known for its port and important commercial harbour, battered – a sad place, harsh on the eye, lacking colour and design.

Instead I found a city which has remade itself with some breathtaking architecture. The glorious city of Amsterdam is only a train ride away. After just a twenty minute stroll from Rotterdam train station, you will find the amazing Markt Hall and beyond it, the bright yellow cube houses designed by architect Piet Bloom.

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IMG_0734 (2)The Markt Hall is unusual … an aircraft hangar shape. Into its curved internal and external walls nestle a multitude of windowed residential apartments. Within the Hall’s centre, a busy indoor market flourishes with over one hundred food stalls, cafes and restaurants on several levels. Most astounding of all are the massive artworks – The Horn of Plenty – massive, brightly coloured flowers and insects – sprawling across its interior ceiling. Some describe it as The Netherlands’ answer to the Sistine Chapel. I loved it!

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IMG_0740 (2)Beyond a nearby park, your eye will seek out the contortionist Cube houses – one of which is open to the public. Just behind, you’ll find a picturesque portion of the historic old harbour offering safe mooring to ancient-looking boats and waterside restaurants.

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Not far from Rotterdam’s centre, only a short train ride away in fact, you’ll find a cluster of windmills, that are also worth visiting, mainly because they are off the tourist trail. One has been transformed into a restaurant.  Time restrictions prevented us from eating there, though we partook of the Dutch Gin (a very different beverage to modern gin) on offer at the bar. Though the sails are now quiet, the shadowy interior with its aromatic wooden walls adorned with old photos and paraphernalia must have borne witness to many dramas. These surviving sentinels offer an appealing peak into The Netherlands’ history as a maritime trading nation, its ingenuity and ability to overcome challenges.

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We left Rotterdam, hopeful of a return visit sometime in the future… a tribute to this resilient city which has faced down a painful past to make something new and wonderful and unexpected. Such is the transformative power of change…

 

 

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